Tag Archives: leisure

Peter Esoka is 50 Years as a Journalist but was he jailed?

Today Peter Esoka was at Hello  Cameroon program brought by one of the journalists that admire him Mr Edwin Kindzeka, who met Peter in church and invited him to this program when he learnt that Peter Esoka the Veteran Journalist clocked 50 this year in the field.

In this panel, Peter shared his experience from the 60s when he joined the broadcasting industry, stating that at that time they only did rebroadcast from Nigeria as Cameroon especially Buea where he was reporting never had the resources and equipment. He stated that they reported mostly through imitating the journalists they admired and this probably might have been one of the reasons they went to the field. Although he never intended being a journalist, he was lured to the profession through a friend.

Although they never had professional training like we have today with students graduating with decrees in Communication and Journalism, they had internal training which compared to that time was far better. Far better in the sense that people should not do journalism as a career(to earn a living)alone but as something they like and are committed to it. He expressed the things he should have done better and the things that could be improved.

Peter for the first time cleared off a prejudice i had and which many still believe today, that because of his vocal reports, he was jailed to underground prison and that this even affected his eyes as he almost went blind. This false rumor and belief is still deeply rooted in the minds of many, who claim it was only President Biya who decided to release him.

Peter Esoka today denied these allegations, admitted he did work with President Amadou Ahidjo by reading his speeches in English likewise with President Biya but never was jailed by whoever. He only after 1972 relocated to the USA and returned when President was already in power. Goose pimples were seen all over me as i saw how naive i was and could believe a thing for close to 30 years without investigating  the truth. It took only today to get facts from the horse’s mouth.

Peter today now serves as the president of the communication commission a position he said was met with congratulations from the head of state recently. He has also faced challenges with the decisions of shutting down some media houses in which many believe that has been unfair in doing so. His job has been very challenging as to freedom of expression in the case of Cameroon.

Although Peter did not have a lot of women at the time he started, he later mentioned some that are still very active today in nation building although not in the journalism industry. He ended his panel by reenacting on the importance of journalism. Be truthful, honest and humble. He admitted that journalists could make mistakes but even at that, they should apologize sincerely when they do. He admits that at his time there was no social media but that any serious and committed journalist will fit even in today’s media architect.

One wonders how many journalists today especially in the crtv can truly and sincerely stand to state that they report what is true and facts. Many have been manipulated by the politicians and many have sold their consciences and help in the society that we have today. As we wish Peter Esoka a happy anniversary, we hope that journalists will take to this call for honesty and humility and help to better the society with facts and truths and maybe sincere analysis for the nation building and eradicate corruption and injustices. Journalists should be like the lawyers who stand as the voice of the voiceless.

Shey Tatah Sevidzem

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GCE Catch up Classes or FENASCO Games Scam or Reality?

The Two Communiques from the Ministry of Secondary Education and that of the Ministry of Sports are either contradictory or confusing. The Ministers are asking GCE students to use the Easter Holidays as a catch up period for their classes, while at the same time Organizing FENASCO B & A Games in the  Regions at the same period.

school team

Fenasco games are usually organized during holidays to make sure that students who are participating do not miss classes while sacrificing on behalf of the schools with their talents. That is why if the games are scheduled during school periods, classes are suspended until the athletes return.

This is no longer the case from the communiques issued by the Minister of Secondary education and that of Sports have been received as a scam by some and confusing to others especially as the launching that was expected to take place today in Bamenda is now being displayed on the CRTV text as Buea.  What was supposed to take place in Bamenda today despite threats of ghost town has been shifted to Monday the 3rd of April.

GBHS Kumbo

Many now question if the confusion in dates and venue is as a result of “April Fool” or strategy for the Government to get mercenaries to participate in the place of the students. Many wonder why a budget of 500 Million shall again be squandered for 4 days for an activity that has not been planned and prepared for. Schools have been deserted for close to 6 months and yet one wonders when the competition took place at the divisional Levels before arriving at the Regional and National. As we write, CRTV is reporting that thousands of students are going for Easter holidays as they visit travel agencies. Why should others be deprived of this same luxury?

Bihbara Richard questions if the GCE has been reduced to nothing that someone can study for two weeks and then ready to get into the Examination room. Shey Mbuh doubting why the Ministers are talking only about the GCE exams ignoring other classes, and the primary pupils if, the school year did not affect them as well. This poses the question of why the Minister wants to cajole the students with Mock prizes while others are in the sports arena.

Shall those from the examination classes be exempted from the Fenasco games or how do they intend to combine the catch up classes with the Fenasco games. Either this is another scam to swindle the 500 million Frs CFA or another scam to lure students register for the GCE that may never take place. Why should a student from Sabongari, Ako etc spend more than 20,000 frs as transportation without accommodation to travel all the way to Bamenda to register for an exam that may cost less and may not take place as students might not go to school due to the Games that are yet to take place.  What about teachers and students who book Easter Holidays for their personal activities to assist families? Shall they also abandon these activities for catch classes and Fenasco games? The government still needs to think and “strategize” well before coming out with communiques that may end up in the garbage.

Shey Tatah sevidzem

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Titles and Cult Membership in Nso (Part 4)

If you missed part 1 to 3 you can get them part 1 here , part 2 here: and part 3 here

Nso culture



The Ŋwéròŋ cults group has a huge fenced compound next to the inner and outer palace court yards. The Ŋwéròŋ compound is composed of many open courts, large halls and various multi-storey and basement apartments to house each of the cults. The compound is arranged in residential quarters each headed by a Sheèy who spends nine (now seven) years as a page of the Ŋwéròŋ cults and is assisted by various Nchiyselav (junior pages).
The Residential quarters are:
 Lav ye Ku-un (Senior House)
 Lav ye Teri (Junior House)
 Lav Ngaŋsi (Senior Escorts’ House)
When the Sheèys graduate after their years (7 or 9) of tutelage and apprenticeship they are ranked among the highest members of the Ŋwéròŋ cults group as a Tav Ŋwéròŋ, second only to the most senior Palace Stewards (Atárnto’).
The rest of the compound is divided into cult houses that may each have physical levels of initiation as deep as 3 or even 5.
Ŋwéròŋ has the following cult house:
 Shiŋkaŋ cult – All members
 Shigwàála’ cult – All members
 Kibaraŋko cult – Ŋwéròŋ wo Teri (Junior Ŋwéròŋ )
 Kingaayasi cult – Ŋwéròŋ wo Teri (Junior Ŋwéròŋ )
 Jwiŋwéròŋ cult – Ŋwéròŋ wo Teri (Junior Ŋwéròŋ )
 Yeŋwéròŋ cult – Ŋwéròŋ wo Ku-un (Senior Ŋwéròŋ )
Each cult has a distinctive masquerade that displays during funeral and other celebrations. The level of occultist knowledge and training, and the rules for initiation and promotion vary from cult to cult.
The highest cult and controller of all Ŋwéròŋ is Yeŋwéròŋ with the highest level of Ŋwéròŋ occultism called Ŋwéròŋ wo Wiy or Ŋwéròŋ Vitsée. All senior Ŋwéròŋ members (ngang se Ŋwéròŋ ) are members of the Yeŋwéròŋ cult, but not all of them see Ŋwéròŋ Vitsée. The members rank from the lowest to the highest members of the inner sanctum, the highest of whom are seven members called “samba wir” who control Ŋwéròŋ wo Wiy. Once a member has attained the highest rank, they are only replaced after death.
Member initiation is generally conducted from the lowest Shiŋkaŋ cult through Shigwàála’, Kibaraŋko, Kingaayasi, Jwiŋwéròŋ to the highest Yeŋwéròŋ cult. A member cannot be initiated fully into Yeŋwéròŋ when they have not fully completed initiation into the cults below. A Yeŋwéròŋ member may also choose to go to a lower cult like Kibaraŋko, in order to become a senior member (samba wir), but this is an uncommon occurrence because of the prestige and power that comes with Yeŋwéròŋ membership.
Ŋwéròŋ also has a distinctive music that is produced by a combination of many types of instruments. All cults have a special meeting day for member fraternization and training that may be different from the general Ŋwéròŋ meeting day of Ntaŋrin (one of the days of the Nso’ 8-day week). Outside of death celebrations Ŋwéròŋ music can be played on a special Ntaŋrin when all members (irrespective of cult) are gathered to fraternize, eat, drink and celebrate.


The Ŋgírì cults group has a fenced compound next to the royal burial ground called Fәm. Like the Ŋwéròŋ compound, the Ŋgírì compound is composed of open courts, large halls and various multi-storey and basements apartments to house each of the many Ŋgírì cults. The compound is tended by a Senior Sheèy and a Junior Sheèy called Taafu (who both spend nine (now seven) years as pages of the Ŋgírì cults). The Ŋgírì compound is divided into cult houses that may each have physical levels of initiation and ranking as deep as 5.
When the Sheèy and Taafu graduate after their years (7 or 9) of tutelage and apprenticeship they are ranked among the highest members of the Ŋgírì cults as a Tav Ŋgírì, second only to the most senior Ŋgírì Lords (Vibay ve Dùy).
Ŋgírì has the following cults:
 Shiŋkaŋ cult
 Shigwàála’ cult
 Wanmabu cult
 Rifem cult
 Moo (Taa Maandzә) cult
 Shiŋwar Ndzә cult
 Nchiy Kibah cult
 Jwiŋgírì cult
 Moomvem (Mbiy a Bami) cult
 Yeŋgírì cult (Ŋgírì Vitsée)
 Subi (Kikum ke Ŋgírì) cult
Each cult has a distinctive masquerade that displays during funeral and other celebrations. In addition Ŋgírì has its distinctive Kikum cult called Subi (a gift from the Oku Fòndom) with a vast array of wooden masks for display during funeral celebrations and other occasions.
The highest cult and controller of all Ŋgírì is Yeŋgírì with the highest level of Ŋgírì occultism called Ŋgírì Vitsée. A Yeŋgírì member may also choose to go to a lower cult like Wanmabu, in order to become a senior member (samba wir), but this is a rare occurrence because of the prestige and power that comes with Yeŋgírì membership. The case of the late Sheèy Isaac Lukong (Sheèy Lukong Docta) is however notable. He chose to forgo Yeŋgírì for the lowest cult Shiŋkaŋ, where he rose to the highest rank that this lowest of cults ever bestowed on a member. To compensate for this choice to sink so low, Sheèy Lukong elected to become a high ranking member of the Ŋgírì cults in the Fòndoms of Mbiame, Oku, Ŋkar, Nsә’ and Kiluun; something that was quite remarkable for a Sheèy to accomplish (some say that is why he baptised himself shuSheèy).
In addition to Subi music, Ŋgírì also has a distinctive music that is produced by a set of varied instruments. All cults have a special meeting day for member fraternization and training that may be different from the general Ŋgírì meeting day of Rәәvәy (one of the days of the Nso’ 8-day week).
It is very easy to differentiate between some Ŋgírì and Ŋwéròŋ masquerades but others are rather difficult to discern. Kibaraŋko for example is this dreadfully ugly disproportionate beast with a huge head, while Wanmabu is a handsome looking agile and athletic space alien with red lips. The very tall, agile and feathered Kingayasi for example is a Ŋwéròŋ-only masquerade which is easy to discern. There are also other Ŋgírì-only masquerades like Moo (Taa Maandzә), Nchiy Kibah (Yeye Boy), Moomvem (Mbiy a Bami), Shingwar Ndzә and Rifem, that are easy to spot. Ŋgírì also has the flamboyant Subi cult (Kikum ke Ŋgírì) with its beautiful masked dancers that Ŋwéròŋ does not have.
Other shared masquerades are however pretty difficult to differentiate except when viewed with a trained eye. In general it is often easy to distinguish the masquerades from their hooded escorts (Vilumsi – sg. Kilumsi), The Ŋgírì Kilumsi is often more colorful and adorned with a few feathers, while the Ŋwéròŋ Kilumsi is often just plain looking with no spotted feathers.
Masquerades like Shiŋkaŋ (pl. Meŋkaŋ) are often easily discernible by their headgear and wear. The Ŋwéròŋ Shiŋkaŋ headgear is often more conservative and the Ŋgírì Shiŋkaŋ headgear more progressive. Ŋgírì Meŋkaŋ are also known to be more daring (especially during the Ŋgvәn funeral ceremonies) where some have been known to come out practically naked wearing just g-strings. The Meŋkaŋ are also often distinguished by their bags and their cups with the Ŋwéròŋ Shiŋkaŋ always carrying a distinctive Ŋwéròŋ bag and cup (bar Ŋwéròŋ).
The Shigwàála’ can be distinguished by the structure of their masks. The Ŋwéròŋ Shigwàála’ mask has very distinctive and human-like facial features with the mouth opening to the skies while the Ŋgírì Shigwàála’ has animal-like facial features with the mouth opening to the front.
The Jwiŋgírì and Jwiŋwéròŋ masquerades are rather similar in appearance with the sole difference that Jwiŋgírì has a royal (sometimes leopard) pelt around its waist line while the Jwiŋwéròŋ is controlled by two special cloth yarns that are tied around the loin and controlled by its attendants.
The Yeŋwéròŋ and Yeŋgírì masquerades are distinguished by their masks like the Shigwàála’. In addition the members of the Yeŋgírì and Yeŋwéròŋ convoys have distinguishing staff, the Ŋwéròŋ staff (mbang Ŋwéròŋ ) is a bamboo or wooden staff with distinctive alternating black rings painted on the upper extremity of the staff. The Ŋgírì staff (mbang Ŋgírì) is made of bamboo or wood with short wooden or bamboo blades inserted on the top-most part of the staff on both sides at a 180 degree angle. The Yeŋwéròŋ convoy at times also carries two wooden child effigies called Won Yenso’ or Won Yensa’ (children of Yenso’ or Yensa’) that signify the two sons of the founder of the Nso’ dynasty (Ŋgonnso’ or Yenso’).

In this paper we have examined the four main male-only Palace cult groupings. We did not touch on female-only cult groups like Chong, Kor and Laalir (Lafelir). Even though non-Palace cults were not the object of this paper we would like to make a comment about these cults because some of them do have a direct impact on the Palace cults, and on the social, political and military activities of the Kingdom.
The Paramount Kingdom of Nso’ is organized into lineages made up of clans and sub-clans that are physically built around large communal settlements called compounds. A village may be made up of many compounds comprising various lineages and sub-lineages that may not necessarily be related. Some of the lineages joined the Nso’ as either junior Fòns or very powerful sub-lineage heads. Many of them came along with very powerful cults some of which were surrendered to the Palace and were integrated into the Palace cults, and some of which remained with the lineage.
Most lineage and sub-lineages that are headed by a Faáy or Shúufaáy will generally have a Rum, Nsang, Kikum (Kikum ke Vitsée), Shi-Kpù-Laa-Dzer, Ngang and other cults, or some combination of male-dominated cults. The Rum cult it must be said was a female-only cult that was abandoned in an unknown river when the women could no longer handle the Rum occultism (shiv se Rum), and the men picked it up downstream, rehabilitated it and then surprisingly banned the women from the Rum cult. The favorite Rum cult chant when it comes out at night is “ee wiy ya ki baa ndzee ey” (ladies beware of the madness curse) putting the ladies on guard to stay away.
Some clans and sub-clans have powerful cults (generally male/female) that they preserve to this day, as can be gleaned from the few examples below.
The Do’ Ruun clan in Kitiwum has a very powerful cult called Maakibu that has been a source of conflict between them and the Palace apparently because the Do’ Ruun clan was supposed to surrender the cult to the Palace (specifically to Ŋwéròŋ ) when they joined Nso’ but they refused to do so and have continued to harness the cult.
When the Taaŋkùm clan of Kimbo joined Nso’, they surrendered the Ŋwéròŋ cults to the Palace as we have seen above, but it is rumored that the original Taaŋkùm leader Shúufaáy Tsәmaloŋ kept some of the Ŋwéròŋ occult for his people. To this day, the Taaŋkùm people still claim the remnant cult that they call Laala (Vitsée).
The Sov clan in upper Dzәkwa is known to have produced some of the greatest warriors that Nso’ has ever known. When the Sov lineage joined Nso’, they came with a powerful warrior cult called Mentsәngoŋ, that was principally a chemical warfare outfit that was always dispatched to neutralize the enemy before the main army (Manjoŋ) arrived and decimated them. The Sov still keep their Mentsәngoŋ cult today, despite the difficulties encountered at times by the clan in controlling the Mentsәngoŋ occultist spirits (shiv se Mentsәngoŋ), difficulties that many observers attribute to lack of member training (as was customary) in the art of managing the very complex chemical concoctions of the cult.
The power and influence of a Man of Title depends on their initiation and their level of authority within the cults. It is also dependent on the amount of time spent by an initiate to ingrain the rules, occultism and/or medicines and chemicals (shiv) of the cults.

Many observers believe the recent weaknesses that are being noticed in the execution of certain cultural norms are thanks to the fact that many of the cults have either relaxed their membership rules or have not evolved them adequately to suit modern times. To understand this better we must examine what it takes to be initiated and to advance in rank within the Ŋwéròŋ and Ŋgírì cults.

To be continued…

Shey Tatah Sevidzem (Wo Scandy)

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Kumbo Horse Race Back to Track

The Kumbo Horse Race used to be one of the annual event that made news in the national territory likewise the Ngonso Festival. Some 25 to 30 years, the race was organized by the Guinness company and this did not only make Kumbo known but also broght the Mbororos out of their isolated camps. The economy used to boom as these Mbororos could spend every dime they saved for this event.


Of recent not much has been talked about the race especially since Guinness left the management and control of it. Others tried but were not very successful, maybe because of the cost it entails. One thing remained in people’s mind was the description of the winner. It was always and usually a little boy that won. One very conservative was called Shaidou…

Kumbo horse race

This year’s horse race switching name from Kumbo Horse Race to Bui Horse Race was organized thanks to the visit of The city of La crosse in the USA by the Kumbo council to give their counterparts another entertaining event that could keep an indelible mark on their minds as they departed Kumbo today. The event met with the Whole Bui Administration attending, Four councils Kumbo, Jakiri  Nkum and Oku fully participating in the Bui horse race., members of parliaments and other dignitaries. Images and more info was offered by Shitu Adamou who covered the colorful event into its entity.

This gave room for speeches from the various stakeholders and Invitees. The Mbororo community could be seen jovial especially as the ladies had the freedom to express their joy through dancing and other forms of entertainment.

The Men on their part exhibited their culture as Lee Rache, the head of delegation from La Crosse to Kumbo council was  honoured during the race at the Tobin municipal stadium by the Mbororo community as WAJIRI of the Mbororo community in USA.

The Horse Race proper was met with many challenges as the competition was tough with as many contesters as possible. Interestingly the interest shown by the young ones moved the crowd as they cheered and supported them.

It should be noted that the Race is sponsored by the following , Tadu Dairy 500,000frs, Kumbo council 250,000frs, and assisted by  Jakiri & Nkum Councils, PMUC 100,000frs each. At the semi finals stage, 20 horses participated with 13 from Jakiri sub division, 5 from kumbo central and 2 from Nkum. The finals saw 9 from Jakiri and one from kumbo central. The first three winners were all from jakiri sub division.

Although or maybe the prizes are the the pulling force, one can lament that an event of such magnitude with such sponsors, a little more could be done to elevate the prizes coupled with the risks, distance and other costs incurred. The 1st went with a cash prize of 150,000frs, carton of savon and a school bag. the 2nd prize was  100,000frs with same items and the 3rd with 75,000frs and same items. The last seven went home with can amount  of 25,000frs and a school bag each. These prizes were handed by the Bui administration, The visitors  from La crosse, Mayors and MP’s respectively .


Shey Tatah Sevidzem (Wo Scandy)

and Shitu Adamou



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Trailer blocked Babanjou road


Traffic became an issue yesterday and today at the Babanjou – Bamenda highway as a trailer lost control and blocked the main road. This meant that passengers had to wait up till 3 hours to be able to use a one way path in the push to cross ever… All had to come down of their vehicles to give way for the cars to struggled to the other side of the road before continuing their journey.


It should be recalled that this is not the first time this same village is experiencing transport difficulties. Early this year, people spent days on the road due to poor roads at the said highway. Babanjou is the village that links the West and North West regions immediately after Santa when coming from Bamenda.

Shey Tatah Sevidzem (Wo Scandy)

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